Reply To: Scrips 2012

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Fatty liver Resolutions

 

Betaine may help to prevent and reverse Fatty Liver.

 

Amino Acids

 

Cysteine may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver:

 

N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver. references

 

S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) may help to prevent and treat Fatty Liver. references

Taurine may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver.

 

Carbohydrates

 

Chondroitin Sulfate may counteract the ability of high consumption of Dietary Fats to cause Fatty Liver.

 

Lipids

 

Gamma-Linolenic Acid (GLA) may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver. references

Phosphatidylcholine may help to prevent and treat Fatty Liver.

 

Peptides

 

Carnitine may alleviate and prevent Fatty Liver – some evidence suggests that Carnitine deficiency within the Liver may be the underlying cause of Fatty Liver.

 

Polyphenols

 

Cynarin may inhibit the ability of Alcohol (ethanol) to cause Fatty Liver. references

Silymarin may alleviate Fatty Liver.

 

Vitamins

 

Fatty Liver may occur as a result of Choline deficiency.

Folic Acid may help to prevent (Alcohol-Related) Fatty Liver.

Inositol may help to prevent Fatty Liver. references

The Pantethine form of Vitamin B5 (600 mg per day) may cause the total disappearance of some cases of Fatty Liver.

 

Vitamin B12 may help to prevent Fatty Liver.

Vitamin C (when consumed prior to or during Alcohol consumption) may inhibit the ability of Alcohol to cause Fatty Liver.

Vitamin E (when consumed prior to or during Alcohol consumption) may inhibit the ability of Alcohol to cause Fatty Liver.

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Recipe for NAFLD—

Using beets and apple as a sauce—take 2 apples peeled and 1 beet chopped and add to a blender and add ¼ cup of water and blend til it is sauced –stop the blender and add to a glass container and utilized 2-3 oz 3 times a day to increase the betaine levels

 

Utilizing HCL supplements with pepsin taking them orally with every meal

 

Taurine Supplements will increase Bile salts that will break down the fatty build up in the liver

 

Sunflower Lecithin or Egg Yolk Lecithin—will remove the excessive fat build up

 

Lipase- will break down the fats in the diet will make it easier on the liver and pancreas

 

Using B5 daily will lower the fatty build up as well

 

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Food police reject preschooler’s homemade lunch… in favour of chicken nuggets
By Meghan Keneally–15th February 2012

A preschool girl was told her homemade meal wasn’t healthy enough – so a school cafeteria monitor made her eat chicken nuggets instead.–The rejected meal consisted of a turkey and cheese sandwich on whole wheat bread, with a side of a banana, potato chips, and apple juice.–“What got me so mad is, number one, don’t tell my kid I’m not packing her lunch box properly” , the mother from North Carolina, who wished to remain anonymous, told a local newspaper.–Homemade goodness: A 4-year-old girl was told that her turkey and cheese sandwich was unhealthy and a school monitor made her buy a lunch–Alternative: The school-made lunch included chicken nuggets instead–‘I pack her lunchbox according to what she eats. It always consists of a fruit. It never consists of a vegetable. She eats vegetables at home because I have to watch her because she doesn’t really care for vegetables.’–The Department of Health and Human Services requires students to eat lunches that consist of meat, milk, grain, and two servings of fruit or vegetables.–It isn’t clear what the entire meal that the cafeteria at West Hoke Elementary School consisted of, but all that the picky four-year-old girl ate were the chicken nuggets.–The mother still wonders what it was exactly that disqualified her meal, and she expects that the bag of potato chips were potentially the problem.–That said, Jani Kozlowski, the spokesperson from the DHHS children’s division said that the meal sounds like it would have passed the federal guidelines test.–‘With a turkey sandwich, that covers your protein, your grain, and if it had cheese on it, that’s the dairy,’ Ms Kozlowski told The Carolina Journal.–‘It sounds like the lunch itself would’ve met all of the standards,’ she said, not having worked with the school in question herself.–On top of the wasted food that was sent home with the little girl at the end of the day was a $1.25 bill for the ‘healthy’ school lunch.-‘I don’t feel that I should pay for a cafeteria lunch when I provide lunch for her from home,’ the mother wrote in a letter to her state representative.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2101354/Food-police-reject-preschoolers-homemade-lunch–favour-chicken-nuggets.html#ixzz1mgu7JFmU

 

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Myths and Truths About Fiber

[1]For decades, fiber has been touted as an essential component of a healthy diet. The supposed benefits of a high-fiber diet have been drilled into us through recommendations by our doctors, government, and the food industry alike, yet many of these health claims have not been proven by research.—In fact, many studies have demonstrated that excess intake of fiber may actually be harmful, particularly for gut health.–The majority of the research supporting the benefits of dietary fiber come from epidemiological studies that link the consumption of fiber-rich fruits and vegetables with a lowered risk of certain diseases such as obesity, heart disease and cancer, particularly colon cancer. (1 [2]) Yet when tested in the lab, controlled intervention trials that simply add fiber supplements to an otherwise consistent diet have not shown these protective effects. (2 [3]) (3 [4]) (4 [5])–The Institute of Medicine recommends a daily fiber intake of 38 grams for men and 25 grams for women (5 [6]), which may come from dietary fibers, both soluble or insoluble, or the addition of “functional fibers” to the diet. The IOM defines functional fibers as non-digestible carbohydrates that have been isolated or extracted from a natural plant or animal source, or they may be manufactured or synthesized. Examples of functional fibers are psyllium husks, chitin from crustacean shells, fructooligosaccharides, polydextrose, and resistant dextrins. (6 [7])—These functional fibers are often added to processed foods as a way to bulk up the fiber content for consumers looking to meet the IOM intake guidelines. A recent report by NPR commented that despite the lack of significant evidence linking fiber intake to health outcomes such as reduced heart disease or cancer, many consumers are buying foods that are fortified with synthetic fiber additives under the guise of health promotion. (7 [8]) Three grams of added fiber is enough to allow these food products to claim to be a good source of fiber, and the food industry has used these fiber guidelines as a way to increase their sales of grain-based products in particular. (8 [9])-Tan and Seow-Choen, in their 2007 editorial on fiber and colorectal disease, call insoluble fiber “the ultimate junk food”, as “it is neither digestible nor absorbable and therefore devoid of nutrition.” (9 [10]) Excess insoluble fiber can bind to minerals such as zinc, magnesium, calcium, and iron, preventing the absorption of these vital nutrients. (10 [11]) Large excesses of certain soluble fibers like pectin and guar may also inhibit pancreatic enzyme activity and protein digestion in the gut, leading to an anti-nutritive effect. (11 [10])– The addition of insoluble and soluble fibers to processed foods may actually cause these foods to be even less nutritious than if they were not enriched with any fiber at all.–A high-fiber diet has also been described as a preventative strategy for the development of diverticulosis, a disease that is markedly more common in Western countries. However, when researchers tested the theory that a high-fiber diet prevented diverticulosis, they not only found that a high intake of fiber did not reduce the prevalence of diverticulosis, but that a high-fiber diet and greater number of bowel movements were independently associated with a higher prevalence of diverticula. (12 [12]) Interestingly, this study found no association between the presence of diverticulosis and red meat intake, fat intake, or physical activity, which are other factors commonly attributed to diverticulosis.–The researchers hypothesized that one possible effect of a high-fiber diet in the development of diverticulosis could be the quantitative and qualitative changes in gut bacteria due to the excessive fiber intake. Both insoluble and soluble fibers are shown to alter gut bacteria in as little as two weeks. (13 [13]) It is possible that the high levels of excess fiber and overgrowth of intestinal bacteria may have contributed to the development of diverticular pouches in the colon.-This hypothesis brings up another side to the fiber debate: the effect of dietary fiber on beneficial gut bacteria, as well as the bacterial fermentation of undigested soluble fiber into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. When we eat the soluble fibers found in whole plant foods, the bacteria in our gut ferment these fibers into short-chain fatty acids like butyrate, proprionate, and acetate, and greater amounts of fiber consumed will lead to greater short-chain fatty acid production. (14 [14]) In this case, naturally occurring soluble fibers are very important for feeding the friendly bacteria that live in our guts.[U1]–One of the risks of long term very low-carbohydrate (VLC) diets, in my view, is the potentially harmful effect they can have on beneficial gut flora. VLC diets starve both bad and good gut bacteria, which means these diets can have therapeutic effects on gut infections in the short term, but may actually contribute to insufficiency of beneficial strains of gut bacteria over the long term. Providing adequate levels of carbohydrate and soluble fiber to feed friendly bacteria is important for optimizing digestive health and maintaining the integrity of the gut lining through the production of short-chain fatty acids.–Stephan Guyenet has written an excellent blog post describing the benefits of butyrate and other short-chain fatty acids on the maintenance of healthy gut integrity. (15 [15]) Butyrate has anti-inflammatory effects, increases insulin sensitivity, and may delay the development of neurodegenerative diseases. It may also be helpful in the treatment of diseases of the colon such as Crohn’s, IBS or ulcerative colitis. (16 [16])—Stephan believes that butyrate may play a significant role in healthy metabolic function, stress resistance, and the immune response. He also asserts that the epidemiologically observed benefits of a diet high in naturally occurring fiber are likely due to the higher butyrate production from these diets. In this case, a higher fiber diet could be protective and beneficial for health, particularly if the fiber is soluble.

So what does this mean for our own consumption of fiber?
Ideally, dietary fiber should be coming from whole food plant sources. Many foods in the Paleo diet are great sources of both soluble and insoluble fiber, such as yams and sweet potatoes, green leafy vegetables, carrots and other root vegetables, fruits with an edible peel (like apples and pears), berries, seeds, and nuts. Interestingly, butyrate itself is also found in high-fat dairy products such as butter and cheese, and can also be provided by the bacteria found in fermented foods. (17 [17])—-Although I recommend that most people get fiber from whole foods, there are some people that may benefit from soluble fiber supplementation – including those that aren’t able to eat fruit or starch due to blood sugar issues or weight regulation, and those with severely compromised gut flora or gut dysbiosis. In these cases I’ve found soluble fiber and/or prebiotic supplements to be helpful.—For healthy people, including a variety of fibrous whole plant foods, fermented foods, and high-fat dairy as tolerated should eliminate the need to supplement with extra fiber, especially those insoluble fibers that are from sources high in anti-nutrients. A Paleo diet with some level of attention paid to the quality and quantity of vegetables, fruits, and starchy tubers can provide adequate levels of soluble fiber to feed the friendly bacteria in the gut that convert these fibers into beneficial short-chain fats like butyrate.

Recommended supplements if needed:

Prebiotic: Klaire Labs Biotagen [18]

Soluble fiber: Organic Acacia Fiber [19]

Caution: it’s crucial to start with a very low dose of prebiotic or soluble fiber and build up slowly over time. This will minimize any potential adverse reaction that can occur with significant changes (even positive changes) to the gut microbiome. For Biotagen, start with 1/4 of 1/8 of a tsp (1/32 tsp.) and increase by 1/32 of a tsp every 4-5 days. For Organic Acacia Fiber, start with 1/4 of a tsp. once per day and build slowly from there.

[1] Image: http://chriskresser.com/wp-content/uploads/all-bran.jpg

 

[2] 1: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19335713

 

[3] 2: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10770980

 

[4] 3: http://jn.nutrition.org.libproxy.lib.unc.edu/content/133/10/3141.full

 

[5] 4: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12223437

 

[6] 5: http://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/DRI_Macronutrients.pdf

 

[7] 6: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/phytochemicals/fiber

 

[8] 7: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/02/13/146706553/is-adding-fiber-to-food-really-good-for-your-health

 

[9] 8: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/FoodSupply/FiberFactSheet.pdf

 

[10] 9: http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/13/4161.pdf

 

[11] 10: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408399109527539

 

[12] 12: http://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(11)01509-5/abstract

 

[13] 13: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271531705802167

 

[14] 14: http://chriskresser.comwww.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/33/4/754.pdf

 

[15] 15: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/12/butyric-acid-ancient-controller-of.html

 

[16] 16: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16633129

 

[17] 17: http://huntgatherlove.com/content/human-colon-evolution-part-4-secrets-butyrate

 

[18] Klaire Labs Biotagen: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001PYXMTQ/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=chrikres-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B001PYXMTQ

[19] Organic Acacia Fiber: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002ON8DU/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=chrikres-

20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0002ON8DU

 

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Butyrate—what it does

 

Sources of Butyrate—

Butter: 3,230 Parmesan Cheese 1,510

Swiss Cheese 1,100 Cream 1,080

Cheddar Cheese 1,050 Gruyere Cheese 1,050

Edam Cheese 1,000 Gouda Cheese 1,000

Cream Cheese 1,000 Feta Cheese 775

Blue Cheese 658 Milk 75

 

Butyric Acid may Enhance the Function of these Substances

 

Microorganisms-Butyric Acid functions as a nutrient for the Beneficial Bacteria within the Digestive Tract.

 

Minerals-Butyric Acid may facilitate the absorption of Calcium in the Colon.

Butyric Acid may facilitate the absorption of Magnesium in the Colon.

 

These Substances may Enhance the Function of Butyric Acid

 

Carbohydrates—Dietary Carbohydrates (especially Polysaccharides) are fermented (by Beneficial Bacteria) within the Large Intestine resulting in the manufacture of Butyric Acid–Inulin may enhance the production of Butyric Acid in the Colon.

Of all Carbohydrates, Starch produces the greatest concentration of Butyric Acid:

The constituent of Starch that most contributes to the production of Butyric Acid is Amylose that escapes digestion (i.e. Resistant Starch).

Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) (by nourishing Beneficial Bacteria in the Intestines which produce Butyric Acid) may facilitate the endogenous production of Butyric Acid in the digestive tract.

Larch Arabinogalactan may stimulate the body’s production of Butyric Acid.

 

Lipids—Acetic Acid may enhance the ability of Butyric Acid to stimulate the absorption of Calcium and Magnesium in the Colon.

 

Microorganisms–Beneficial Bacteria within the Large Intestine (especially the Colon) are responsible for the fermentation of dietary Carbohydrates that result in the production of Butyric Acid.

 

Pharmaceutical Drugs–Aspirin may enhances the ability of Butyric Acid to prevent Colon Cancer.

 

Resveratrol may enhance the ability of Butyric Acid to prevent Colon Cancer.

 

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Betaine

 

Betaine may help to prevent and reverse Fatty Liver. references

 

Amino Acids

 

Cysteine may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver: references

 

N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver. references

 

S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) may help to prevent and treat Fatty Liver. references

Taurine may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver. references

 

Carbohydrates

 

Chondroitin Sulfate may counteract the ability of high consumption of Dietary Fats to cause Fatty Liver. references

 

Lipids

 

Gamma-Linolenic Acid (GLA) may help to prevent Alcohol-induced Fatty Liver. references

Phosphatidylcholine may help to prevent and treat Fatty Liver. references

 

Peptides

 

Carnitine may alleviate and prevent Fatty Liver – some evidence suggests that Carnitine deficiency within the Liver may be the underlying cause of Fatty Liver. references

 

Polyphenols

 

Cynarin may inhibit the ability of Alcohol (ethanol) to cause Fatty Liver. references

Silymarin may alleviate Fatty Liver. references

 

Vitamins

 

Fatty Liver may occur as a result of Choline deficiency. references

Folic Acid may help to prevent (Alcohol-Related) Fatty Liver. references

Inositol may help to prevent Fatty Liver. references

The Pantethine form of Vitamin B5 (600 mg per day) may cause the total disappearance of some cases of Fatty Liver.

 

Vitamin B12 may help to prevent Fatty Liver. references

Vitamin C (when consumed prior to or during Alcohol consumption) may inhibit the ability of Alcohol to cause Fatty Liver.

Vitamin E (when consumed prior to or during Alcohol consumption) may inhibit the ability of Alcohol to cause Fatty Liver.

 

Betaine-2

 

Betaine (especially the Trimethylglycine (TMG) form of Betaine) may help to prevent Cardiovascular Diseases (due to Betaine functioning as a methyl donor which lowers Homocysteine levels).

 

Digestive System

 

Betaine Hydrochloride may reduce the risk of Gallstones in persons with low levels of Hydrochloric Acid (i.e. in persons afflicted with Hypochlorhydria).

Betaine Hydrochloride may alleviate many cases of Heartburn (by increasing the level of Hydrochloric Acid in the Stomach).

 

Betaine Hydrochloride functions as a supplemental source of Hydrochloric Acid for Hypochlorhydria patients.

Betaine Hydrochloride may be useful for the treatment of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome (Hypochlorhydria (lack of Hydrochloric Acid) patients have increased risk of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome. Betaine Hydrochloride is a source of supplemental Hydrochloric Acid that may eliminate Hypochlorhydria and therefore eliminate the underlying cause of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome). [more info]

 

Immune System

 

Betaine Hydrochloride may prevent and treat Allergies (insufficient production of Hydrochloric Acid in the Stomach (Hypochlorhydria) is believed to be an underlying cause of some Allergies and Betaine Hydrochloride is a supplemental source of Hydrochloric Acid).

Betaine Hydrochloride may suppress or kill Helicobacter pylori (Hypochlorhydria (lack of Hydrochloric Acid) patients have increased levels of Helicobacter pylori – Betaine Hydrochloride is a source of supplemental Hydrochloric Acid).

 

Metabolism

 

Betaine may improve Athletic Performance (by improving the body’s Energy levels, increasing Stamina and improving the body’s utilization of Oxygen).

Betaine may increase the body’s Energy levels.

Betaine may increase the Liver’s efficiency in metabolizing Fatty Acids.

 

Betaine may reduce elevated Homocysteine levels (during its metabolism within the body, Betaine transfers one of its Methyl Groups to Homocysteine, causing Homocysteine to be converted to Methionine; Betaine, by losing one methyl group becomes Dimethyl Glycine (DMG)).

Betaine may detoxify and stimulate the Liver:

Betaine may help to prevent Cirrhosis.

Betaine may help to prevent and reverse Fatty Liver.

Betaine may improve the body’s utilization of Oxygen.

Betaine may increase Stamina.