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Fruit Flies Use Alcohol as a Drug to Kill Parasites

 

If fruit flies infected with wasps tap the alcohol in rotting fruit, it raises their blood-alcohol levels and their survival rates. The alcohol doesn’t just kill some of the wasps, it essentially liquifies them. ScienceDaily (Feb. 16, 2012) — Fruit flies infected with a blood-borne parasite consume alcohol to self-medicate, a behavior that greatly increases their survival rate, an Emory University study finds.–“We believe our results are the first to show that alcohol consumption can have a protective effect against infectious disease, and in particular against blood-borne parasites,” says Todd Schlenke, the evolutionary geneticist who led the research.–“It may be that fruit flies are uniquely adapted to using alcohol as medicine,” he adds, “but our data raise an important question: Could other organisms, perhaps even humans, control blood-borne parasites through high doses of alcohol?”—-Current Biology is publishing the study, co-authored by Emory graduate student Neil Milan and undergraduate student Balint Kacsoh.-The results add to the growing body of evidence that some animals know how to use toxic substances found in nature as medicine. Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly that swirls around browning bananas in your kitchen, is an important biological model system. The Schlenke lab uses D. melanogaster to study how immune systems adapt to pathogens. The fly larvae eat the rot, or fungi and bacteria, that grows on overripe, fermenting fruit. “They’re essentially living in booze,” Schlenke says. “The amount of alcohol in their natural habitat can range from 5 to 15 percent. Imagine if everything that you ate and drank all day long was 5-percent alcohol. We wouldn’t be able to live like that, but fruit flies are really good at detoxifying alcohol.”–Tiny, endoparasitoid wasps are major killers of fruit flies. The wasps inject their eggs inside the fruit fly larvae, along with venom that aims to suppress their hosts’ immune response. If the venom is effective enough, the wasp egg hatches, and the wasp larva begins to eat the fruit fly larva from the inside out. Eventually, an adult wasp emerges from the remains of the fruit fly pupa. Some fruit flies, however, can overcome the effects of wasp venom and mount an immune response against wasp eggs. The blood cells in these fly larvae swarm over the wasp eggs and release nasty chemicals to kill them, allowing the fruit fly larvae to grow into adults.–“A constant co-evolutionary battle is going on between the immune systems of the flies and the venoms of the wasps,” Schlenke says. “Any new mechanism of defense that protects flies from wasps will tend to spread through fly populations by natural selection.” Schlenke wondered if the fruit flies could be tapping the toxic effects of alcohol in their natural habitat to fight off wasps.

To test the theory, the researchers used a bisected petri dish filled with the yeast that fruit flies are normally fed in a lab environment. The yeast on one side of the dish was mixed with 6 percent alcohol, while the yeast on the other side remained alcohol-free. The researchers then released fruit fly larvae into the dish, allowing them to freely move to either side.

After 24 hours, 80 percent of the fruit fly larvae that were infected with wasps were on the alcohol side of the dish, while only 30 percent of the non-infected fruit fly larvae were on the alcohol side.—“The strength of the result was surprising,” Schlenke says. “The infected fruit flies really do seem to purposely consume alcohol, and the alcohol consumption correlates to much higher survival rates.” Infected fruit flies that consumed alcohol beat out the wasps in about 60 percent of the cases, compared to a 0 percent survival rate for fruit fly controls that fed on plain yeast.–“The wasps aren’t as good as the flies at handling alcohol,” Schlenke says. A developing wasp knocked out within an alcohol-consuming fly larva dies in a particularly horrible way, he adds. “The wasp’s internal organs disperse and appear to be ejected out of its anus. It’s an unusual phenotype that we haven’t seen in our wasps before,” Schlenke says.—The lab repeated the experiment using another species of wasp that specializes in laying its eggs in D. melanogaster, rather than the generalist wasp used previously. Again, 80 percent of the infected flies wound up on the alcohol side of the dish, while only 30 percent of the uninfected flies did. But the alcohol diet was far less effective against the specialist wasps, killing them in only 10 percent of the cases.—“You would expect this kind of result,” Schlenke says, “since the generalist wasp species can attack plenty of other flies, but the specialist wasps are under strong pressure to adapt to the alcohol-infused habitat of D. melanogaster.”–The researchers hope that their data will lead to more studies of how alcohol may control pathogens in other organisms, including humans.—“Although many studies in humans have shown decreased immune function in chronic consumers of alcohol, little attempt has been made to assay any beneficial effect of acute or moderate alcohol use on parasite mortality or overall host fitness following infection,” Schlenke says. Story Source- The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Emory University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above. Journal Reference-Neil F. Milan, Balint Z. Kacsoh, Todd A. Schlenke. Alcohol Consumption as Self-Medication against Blood-Borne Parasites in the Fruit Fly. Current Biology, 2012; DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2012.01.045

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Recipe with alcohol—utilize any brandy or vodka or clean alcohol beverage—then add to it wormwood or clove or black walnut extract with the beverage or balm of gilead or bee Propolis and add 3 drops

 

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B.C. paves way for all-in-one identity card-ID to start out as more secure CareCard

 

The B.C. government is moving forward with plans for high-tech identity cards that will one day let people access a host of provincial services on the Internet. The province intends to sign a $20-million, six-year deal with Toronto-based SecureKey to provide card reader technology, the government says. It’s the latest in a series of new laws and contracts that pave the way for expanded government Internet services.–The cards may one day be used to access government websites for electronic health records, prescription histories, age verification, driver’s licence details, electronic voting and school registration for children. Currently, you have to visit a government office in person and show appropriate ID to access such services.–Health Minister Mike de Jong announced last May the government was developing new CareCards, with improved security features, to combat the millions of dollars lost to health insurance fraud.[U3]–Those cards should be available in November, and will roll out over the next five years. They’ll be free and mandatory for all British Columbians, requiring millions of people to re-enrol into the healthcare system. The project is expected to cost the government about $150 million.–People will also have the option of combining their new CareCard and driver’s licence into one B.C. Services Card.–The new government cards will have embedded security chips, similar to certain credit cards that allow customers to wirelessly make purchases by touching or waving their credit card in front of a terminal.–The government’s contract with SecureKey will develop B.C. card readers – key-sized devices that plug into a computer’s USB port. People tap their new CareCard or Services Card onto the SecureKey reader and enter a PIN number on a government website, to authenticate their identity.—There won’t be any online government services available when the cards launch in November. The province has proposed a rollout of features from different ministries over the next five years.–B.C. said it will directly award SecureKey a contract because the company already holds a contract with the federal government and the province wants its system to be compatible with Canada’s service.—NDP critic Doug Routley said the Liberal government has a dismal track record on protecting privacy and should have asked for other bids. “I know some pretty good roofers, but I’d still get three quotes on a roof,” he said. “It’d still be prudent to put this out there for competition.”–There remains many privacy questions about the direction the government is headed, said Vince Gogolek, executive director of the B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association. He said the government rushed through legislation last fall that allows for crossministry sharing of personal information needed by the new cards.—The government said it is consulting with the independent privacy commission on the technology.–Identity cards won’t store any information inside their chips, and the SecureKey readers simply create a secure path and network to approve a person’s ID and re-direct them back to government information, officials said Friday.-The cards can be remotely cancelled if lost, and will only access the minimum amount of personal information required for a service – for example, a birth date to prove an age or a health number for prescriptions.

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Nanoparticles in Food, Vitamins Could Harm Human Health

 

ScienceDaily (Feb. 16, 2012) — Billions of engineered nanoparticles in foods and pharmaceuticals are ingested by humans daily, and new Cornell research warns they may be more harmful to health than previously thought.—A research collaboration led by Michael Shuler, the Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Chemical Engineering and the James and Marsha McCormick Chair of Biomedical Engineering, studied how large doses of polystyrene nanoparticles — a common, FDA-approved material found in substances from food additives to vitamins — affected how well chickens absorbed iron, an essential nutrient, into their cells.–The results were reported online Feb. 12 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. According to the study, high-intensity, short-term exposure to the particles initially blocked iron absorption, whereas longer-term exposure caused intestinal cell structures to change, allowing for a compensating uptick in iron absorption.– The researchers tested both acute and chronic nanoparticle exposure using human gut cells in petri dishes as well as live chickens and reported matching results. They chose chickens because these animals absorb iron into their bodies similarly to humans, and they are also similarly sensitive to micronutrient deficiencies, explained Gretchen Mahler, Ph.D. ’08, the paper’s first author and former Cornell graduate student and postdoctoral associate.–The researchers used commercially available, 50-nanometer polystyrene carboxylated particles that are generally considered safe for human consumption. They found that following acute exposure, a few minutes to a few hours after consumption, both the absorption of iron in the in vitro cells and the chickens decreased.—But following exposure of 2 milligrams per kilogram for two weeks — a slower, more chronic intake — the structure of the intestinal villi began to change and increase in surface area. This was an effective physiological remodeling that led to increased iron absorption.–“This was a physiological response that was unexpected,” Mahler said.–Shuler noted that in some sense this intestinal villi remodeling was positive because it shows the body adapts to challenges. But it serves to underscore how such particles, which have been widely studied and considered safe, cause barely detectable changes that could lead to, for example, over-absorption of other, harmful compounds.[U4]–Human exposure to nanoparticles is only increasing, Shuler continued.–“Nanoparticles are entering our environment in many different ways,” Shuler said. “We have some assurance that at a gross level they are not harmful, but there may be more subtle effects that we need to worry about.”–The paper included Cornell co-authors Mandy Esch, a research associate in biomedical engineering; Elad Tako, a research associate at the Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health; Teresa Southard, assistant professor of biomedical sciences; Shivaun Archer, senior lecturer in biomedical engineering; and Raymond Glahn, senior scientist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service and courtesy associate professor in the Department of Food Science. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation; New York State Office of Science, Technology and Academic Research; Army Corp of Engineers; and U.S. Department of Agriculture.—Story Source-The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Cornell University, via Newswise. The original article was written by Anne Ju. –Journal Reference-Gretchen J. Mahler, Mandy B. Esch, Elad Tako, Teresa L. Southard, Shivaun D. Archer, Raymond P. Glahn, Michael L. Shuler. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption. Nature Nanotechnology, 2012; DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2012.3

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Building Bone from Cartilage- Orthopaedic Researchers Take the Road Less Travelled

ScienceDaily (Feb. 14, 2012) — A person has a tumor removed from her femur. A soldier is struck by an improved explosive device and loses a portion of his tibia. A child undergoes chemotherapy for osteosarcoma but part of the bone dies as a result. Every year, millions of Americans sustain fractures that don’t heal or lose bone that isn’t successfully grafted. But a study presented at the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) 2012 Annual Meeting in San Francisco offers new hope for those who sustain these traumas. Orthopaedic researchers with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Orthopaedic Trauma Institute, have found a very promising, novel way to regenerate bone. “Cartilage graft induces bone that actually integrates with the host bone and vascularizes it,” said Ralph S. Marcucio, PhD, Associate Professor, UCSF School of Medicine.–Cartilage graft is very different than the current methods used for bone grafting — autograft bone (a person’s own bone) or allograft materials (donor bone). For various reasons, these two grafting techniques can result in poor graft integration and osteonecrosis.—“With millions of bone grafting procedures performed every year in just the United States, developing improved technologies could directly enhance patient care and clinical outcomes,” Dr. Marcucio said.–Chelsea S. Bahney, PhD, Postdoctoral Scholar, UCSF School of Medicine, concedes their approach is less orthodox. “It is not the pathway that most people think about, but it made a lot more sense to follow the normal developmental mechanism.””This cartilage is naturally bioactive. It makes factors that help induce vascularization and bone formation,” added Dr. Bahney. “When people use a bone graft, it is often dead bone which requires something exogenous to be added to it or some property of the matrix in the graft.” Through a process called endochondral ossification, cartilage grafts produce new tissue that is very similar to the person’s own bone. Without additional properties to it, the researchers found the cartilage graft integrated well and was fully vascularized.–“We’re just taking a very similar cartilage that can induce bone formation, putting it into a bone defect and letting it just do its thing,” Dr. Marcucio said.—In the study, the researchers chose a non-stabilized tibial fracture callus as a source of a cartilage graft. “Healing of the transplanted cartilage grafts supported our hypothesis by producing a well-vascularized bone that integrated well with the host,” Dr. Bahney said.–“A cartilage graft could offer a promising alternative approach for stimulating bone regeneration,” Dr. Marcucio said. “Future work will focus on developing a translatable technology suitable for repairing bone through a cartilage intermediate at a clinical level.”–Story Source–The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS).

 

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Show of the Week March 5 2012

 

Scientists Prepare Test-tube Burger

 

300,000 Organic Farmers Sue Monsanto in Federal Court

Decision on March 31st to Go to Trial

 

Secret GPS tracker terrifies Ontario man

 

New Ability to Regrow Blood Vessels Holds Promise for Treatment of Heart Disease

 

Colon Cleanse

 

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Scientists Prepare Test-tube Burger
CLIVE COOKSON – Financial Times (U.K.)
I think there is going to be a tremendous emphasis on this. It will become a growing trend, because industrial cattle operations are going to become unprofitable due to the rising cost of water as it becomes scarcer. It takes 1,300 gallons of water to produce an eight ounce hamburger. As affluence increases across the world — not to be confused with wealth, only more than subsistence — eating meat will increase. The demands for ! water and grain (and the water it requires) will become unsustainable. The world’s first test-tube hamburger, created in a Dutch laboratory by growing muscle fibres from bovine stem cells, will be ready to grill in October, scientists believe.–‘I am planning to ask Heston Blumenthal [the celebrity chef] to cook it,” Mark Post, leader of the artificial meat project at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, told the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Vancouver.–Researchers believe that meat grown in factories, rather than on farms, will be a more sustainable and less environmentally harmful source of food. Live cattle and pigs are only 15 per cent efficient at converting vegetable proteins to meat from the grass and cereals they eat[U5].–
‘If we can raise the efficiency from 15 to 50 per cent by growing meat in the lab, that would be a tremendous leap forward,” Professor Post said.—Starting with bovine stem cells[U6], the Dutch researchers have grown muscle fibres up to 3cm long and 0.5mm thick. The fibres are tethered and exercised as they grow, like real muscles, by bending and stretching in the culture dishes. They feed on a broth of vegetable proteins and other nutrients, equivalent to the grass or grain diet of cattle.[U7]—At present the fibres are a pallid yellowish-pink colour, rather than the red of raw ground beef, because they do not contain blood,[U8] but Prof Post plans to improve their appearance.–Patrick Brown, biochemistry professor at Stanford University in California, told the AAAS that global meat consumption was expected to double by 2050, yet livestock farming already accounted for 18 per cent of man-made greenhouse gas emissions and threatened biodiversity worldwide[U9].–
To provide fat, an essential element in real burgers, They will be minced in with bovine fat cells are also being grown in the lab.the muscle fibres.—
This project was started about six years ago, and I expect it will be another 10 to 20 years before we can mass-produce our meat,” Prof Post said.

An anonymous individual has financed the Maastricht project with a €250,000 grant[U10]. He is expected to contribute further funds after the planned production of a ‘proof of concept” burger from the lab-grown muscle in October.

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300,000 Organic Farmers Sue Monsanto in Federal Court: Decision on March 31st to Go to Trial

The GMO movement is perhaps the leading example in our culture of how the greed of a single corporation can destabilize and entire ecosystem, thus effecting the lives of millions; all so a small group of people already rich can get richer. Nelson states, ‘Corporate control of our food system has led to the loss of millions of family farmers, destruction of our soil…”-Hundreds of citizens, (even including NYC chefs in their white chef hats) joined Occupy the Food System groups, ie Food Democracy Now, gathered outside the Federal Courts in Manhattan on January 31st, to support organic family farmers in their landmark lawsuit against Big Agribusiness giant Monsanto. (Organic Seed Growers & Trade Association v. Monsanto) Oral arguments were heard that day concerning the lawsuit by 83 plaintiffs representing over 300,000 organic farmers, organic seed growers, and organic seed businesses.—The lawsuit addresses the bizarre and shocking issue of Monsanto harassing and threatening organic farmers with lawsuits of ‘patent infringement” if any organic farmer ends up with any trace amount of GM seeds on their organic farmland.[U11] Judge Naomi Buckwald heard the oral arguments on Monsanto’s Motion to Dismiss, and the legal team from Public Patent Foundation represented the rights of American organic farmers against Monsanto, maker of GM seeds, [and additionally, Agent Orange, dioxin, etc.]—After hearing the arguments, Judge Buckwald stated that on March 31st she will hand down her decision on whether the lawsuit will move forward to trial.–Not only does this lawsuit debate the issue of Monsanto potentially ruining the organic farmers’ pure seeds and crops with the introduction of Monsanto’s genetically modified (GM) seeds anywhere near the organic farms, but additionally any nearby GM fields can withstand Monsanto’s Roundup herbicides, thus possibly further contaminating the organic farms nearby if Roundup is used.[U12]—Of course, the organic farmers don’t want anything to do with that ole contaminated GM seed in the first place. In fact, that is why they are certified organic farmers. But now they have to worry about getting sued by the very monster they abhor, and even have to spend extra money and land (for buffers which only sometimes deter the contaminated seed from being swept by the wind into their crop land). [U13]At this point, they are even having to resort to not growing at all the following organic plants: soybeans, corn, cotton, sugar beets, and canola, …just to protect themselves from having any (unwanted) plant that Monsanto could possibly sue them over.[U14]

 

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Secret GPS tracker terrifies Ontario man

An Ontario man says he’s angry and frightened after discovering someone hid a GPS tracking device under his vehicle, apparently to secretly monitor his movements.—“I was doing just a regular inspection on my truck and I found this black box under my truck … with flashing lights inside,” Ben Ferrill of Warsaw, Ont., told Go Public. “I didn’t know what it was. I didn’t know if it was a bomb. We were scared to death … It felt like a movie — unreal.”—After making the discovery last fall he reported it the next morning to the Ontario Provincial Police. Ferrill said the OPP tried to find out whom the device belonged to to lay a mischief charge, but were stymied in their investigation.—“I feel powerless. I can’t do anything about it and I really wish the police did more. I really wish they would do more — and I’m upset,” Ferrill said. Ferrill said he and his wife haven’t been able to sleep properly since, because they are worried someone is watching them.[U15] “We spent lots of nights up until three in the morning crying and talking about it — not sleeping and looking out the windows and being suspicious of vehicles that drive by,” Ferrill said. “Are they following me? Are they watching me? Are they going to try to do something to me? Are they going to try to do something to our family? The fear in finding something like that is unreal.”Ferrill’s lawyer, Ian Wilson, said is illegal to put a tracking device on someone else’s vehicle without their knowledge or consent unless there is a search warrant.—“The trouble is, we don’t know who is behind this,” Wilson said.[U16] The device Ferrill found, Wilson said, was sold by an American company, U.S. Fleet Tracking, which sells GPS systems to companies that want to track their fleet vehicles. The OPP obtained a production order, compelling the Canadian company that provides the wireless connection, Kore Wireless, to disclose whose device it is. However, Kore said it didn’t have that information[U17]. “I’ve [also] tried to get answers from Kore Wireless and their lawyer but they will tell me nothing,” Wilson said. Kore Wireless president Alex Brisbourne told CBC News his company only provides “connectivity. We don’t know who the end user is.”He said U.S. Fleet bills the customer and gives access to its website, where the customer can track its fleet vehicles in real time. “Our customer [U.S. Fleet] is in the United States. They have no responsibility or accountability to provide that information [to Canadian police],” Brisbourne said. When asked whether he requested the customer information from U.S. Fleet in this case, Brisbourne replied it “is not appropriate for us to ask for that. Security of information is particularly critical.” U.S. Fleet’s website makes it clear the company does not give up information easily, even to American authorities. “U.S. Fleet Tracking will not under any circumstance make your information or any data specific to your vehicle tracking account available to any third party — including local, state or federal law enforcement authorities [U18]… Even if presented with a court order, we promise to fight the courts to keep this information private and respect the privacy of our paying customers,” the website reads.

Wilson and Ferrill said the OPP told them it would be too expensive and time-consuming to pursue the case through U.S. courts. The OPP told CBC News the file is now closed.–Ferrill insisted the device could not have been put there by his wife or any family member. In addition, U.S. Fleet sells to to businesses, not individuals.–He said the only dispute he is involved in is with his former employer, a car dealership in Peterborough, Ont.–Ferrill worked for a decade as a mechanic for Holiday Ford Lincoln. Two years ago, he injured his shoulder on the job. The Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) in Ontario said he needed to be on light, restricted duty for several months.–After a few months, Holiday Ford fired him for allegedly stealing a bottle of windshield washer fluid.–A WSIB investigation found it was a pretext – that Ferrill had been fired because he was injured, which is a violation of the law. The WSIB report concluded: “A breach of their re-employment obligation has occurred.”Holiday Ford is appealing that decision, but it faces significant fines if the ruling stands. It is also facing a wrongful-dismissal lawsuit filed by Ferrill.–The company has denied Ferrill’s allegations in court filings.–Ferrill said he discovered the GPS device a few months after filing his lawsuit. He and his lawyer said they suspect the dealership could be involved, but they have no way of proving or disproving that.–CBC News left several messages with Ferrill’s former manager at Holiday Ford, but received no reply.–He has no idea how long it was there, and said the combined stress has pushed his family to the edge.–“Losing my job was really stressful, and then this is just a part of more stress,” Ferrill said. “It’s really testing our family. It’s the most stress and discomfort we have ever had.” Ferrill and his lawyer want Canadians to realize how technology can now be used against them and — at least in this case —there is no recourse.“It’s extremely frustrating to know that [customer] information exists in the U.S. somewhere … and we simply can’t get at it,” Wilson said. “[Ferrill] hasn’t had any peace of mind for the last 2½ years since he lost his job.”–Wilson said he finds it ironic this is happening to his client at the same time the federal government is talking about allowing police to monitor people’s internet use without a warrant.–“The same federal government that is responsible for this crime bill is also responsible for these wireless companies,” Wilson said.—He said he believes wireless companies in Canada should be required by law to know who the end users of the technology are: “This is a changing environment and steps have to be taken to protect people.” “We want to know who put this on our truck and why,” Ferrill said. “I’m sure whoever did this wants to do some type of harm to me, because whoever did this wants to know what I am doing all the time and wants to follow me for some reason.”

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New Ability to Regrow Blood Vessels Holds Promise for Treatment of Heart Disease

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Hindlimb ischemia was created in rats and treatments were delivered over seven days with an osmotic pump. The laser doppler imaging above shows the rat’s hind limb prior to treatment (on the left) and with increased blood flow (image on the right) just seven days after treatment.

ScienceDaily (Feb. 16, 2012) — University of Texas at Austin researchers have demonstrated a new and more effective method for regrowing blood vessels in the heart and limbs — a research advancement that could have major implications for how we treat heart disease, the leading cause of death in the Western world.—The treatment method developed by Cockrell School of Engineering Assistant Professor Aaron Baker could allow doctors to bypass surgery and instead repair damaged blood vessels simply by injecting a lipid-incased substance into a patient. Once inside the body, the substance stimulates cell growth and spurs the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones.—Aaron Baker is an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.—The method has been tested successfully on rats, and findings of the study were published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences –“Others have tried using growth factors to stimulate vessel growth in clinical trials and have not been successful,” said Baker, a faculty member in the school’s Department of Biomedical Engineering. “We think that a major reason for this is that previous methods assumed that the diseased tissues retained the ability to respond to a growth stimulus. Our method basically delivers extra components that can restore growth factor responsiveness to the tissue of patients with long-standing clinical disease.”—[U19] The ability to regrow blood vessels could prove crucial to treating chronic myocardial ischemia disease, which affects up to 27 million patients in the U.S. and leads to a reduction of blood flow in the heart and lower limbs — ultimately causing organ dysfunction and failure.–Central ischemia, which affects the heart, occurs when the coronary vessels that feed blood to the heart become blocked or narrow because of a buildup of fatty deposits called plaques. Such plaques are typically the result of a prolonged unhealthy diet or smoking, and factors such as age, high blood pressure and diabetes increase the risks of the disease, Baker said.

Doctors have typically treated ischemia by physically opening the closed artery with a stent or surgically rerouting blood flow to the poorly perfused tissue. Both methods have limitations, however, and are not effective long-term.–The new method introduced by Baker and his research team builds on a promising revascularization approach that, up until now, has shown limited efficacy in clinical trials for treating human disease.—The method combines a growth factor — a substance capable of stimulating cellular growth, proliferation and cellular differentiation, as well as healing wounds — known as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) with a lipid-embedded receptor to enhance its activity.—A challenge for scientists and engineers, however, has been getting FGF-2 to bind with cell receptors — the very molecules often found on the surface of the cell that receive chemical signals and direct activity in the cell from outside sources.—To overcome this, Baker’s method embeds the growth factors in synthetic lipid-based nanoparticles containing a coreceptor known as syndecan-4. The nanoparticles containing co-receptors that, when delivered with the growth factor, enable improved cell binding so that the growth factor can direct the targeted cell to divide, proliferate and form new cells for tissue regrowth.—The incased substance was injected into rats with hindlimb ischemia and stimulated a complete recovery from the ischemia in just seven days.—“We hope this research will increase our understanding of how tissues become resistant to revascularization therapies and may lead to more effective treatments for this widespread and debilitating disease,” said Baker, who was recognized last year with the National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award.-Story Source—The above story is reprinted from materials provided by University of Texas at Austin. -Journal Reference-E. Jang, H. Albadawi, M. T. Watkins, E. R. Edelman, A. B. Baker. Syndecan-4 proteoliposomes enhance fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-induced proliferation, migration, and neovascularization of ischemic muscle. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2012; 109 (5): 1679 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1117885109

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Colon Cleanse–

add the whites of the Citrus -about 8 slices- then add 1 whole apple- add a pectin capsule ( if you wish not mandatory ) add bht 1 capsule-or any other antioxidant you see fit to add–example vitamin C-add sodium alginate 1 tsp -tumeric 1 tsp- bromelain powder or capsule 1 tablespoon -add 1/8 cup of water and allow to blend at slow to medium speed til it gelatinizes–once this is done pour into a glass container and consume several tsp through out the day and use a good load of water—this will bind to metals-toxins-will support the liver-digestive system-and potentially reduce fatty deposits in the gall bladder and liver

 

 

 

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[U1]Horse (*&^ this a lie and a deception
[U2]Should have Your Name—not dear customer
[U3]Again the Excuse to Violate Privacy
[U4]In other words if you are exposed to to other metals or poisons or foods that may produce a poison this will allow for a higher uptake of these contents further damaging the internals—and If there are air borne particles as well then what you may have is an exacbrated level of these being absorbed
[U5]Well I wonder why!! Since the soy shuts down there thyroids and there pancreas how can the animal process anything accurately???—these GE or GMO foods are not meant for them to consume either
[U6]Now am I the only one seeing this GMO MEAT or GE meat—playing with genetics to alter the dna of this meat and then feed it to the Human race—-we must be less then dust in the eyes of the powers that be!! Time to send them home!
[U7]Vegetable Proteins—SOY or other GMO and this is going to be used in the Genetic sequencing—-now what does this do to People!!!
[U8]Life is in the blood so what then is this—the is a design of food for something other then life as we know it—this is to feed something else and if people eat this then there will be health hazards
[U9]Another lie—the green house gasses being emitted are not from the animals but rather the Bio diversity of the GMOs and there interference with the balance of this planet
[U10]BG –Bill Gates—orrr my likely guess since he has financial power or perhaps the Vatican since they own the gmos and GE through monsanto
[U11]The Law has to change if a seed is found on a piece of land then Monsanto is responsible for it so farmer do not lose there lands because of second hand negligence and this would contain or limit the amount of cross breeding of the seed with the real crop—the law is stacked in Monsanto’s favour and this needs to be addressed

[U12]This is already happening —you cannot co exist in the real world—the moment you plant this abomination it corrupts what is naturally occurring—the biggest lie being perpetrated in the health food industry next to GMP —all Crap
[U13]This would be enough for a lawsuit since it is on the land and there according to Monsanto illegally even the buffer doe not deter any kind of genetic anomaly with this barrier

[U14]Not growing Soy or Canola or corn at this stage of the game may not be a bad idea

[U15]Time to wake up –a truck driver is always being monitored

[U16]The Question everyone should be asking is –what was he hauling that required him to be under surveillance—what could have been so important as to have this kind of Black opp to take place—the fact he was monitored is not an issue –truckers are always monitored but to have this kind of sophistication –there must have been something of the utmost importance—maybe a Bio contaminant for military use –maybe a military equipment needing to be transported unnoticed—who knows
[U17]Now does this sound funny—I mean with everything today asking you for id and wanting to know if you had cornflakes or pancakes in the morning does this not see a touch odd “ they don’t know”
[U18]I think this is good actually and more companies need to apply this kind of security—
[U19]It is in the delivery —the fat could be a lipsome to carry to the area what is required for regenerating the issues

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Show Of The Week March 9 2012

 

Food Fried in Olive or Sunflower Oil Is Not Linked to Heart Disease

 

Stronger Intestinal Barrier May Prevent Cancer in the Rest of the Body

 

Boosting Longevity With Good Bacteria

The effect of hydro alcoholic Nettle (Urtica dioica) extracts on insulin sensitivity and some inflammatory indicators in patients with type 2 diabetes-

What are you to do if you have a heart attack While you are alone

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Food Fried in Olive or Sunflower Oil Is Not Linked to Heart Disease

ScienceDaily (Jan. 24, 2012) — Eating food fried in olive or sunflower oil is not linked to heart disease or premature death, finds a paper published in the British Medical Journal online (bmj.com).-The authors stress, however, that their study took place in Spain, a Mediterranean country where olive or sunflower oil is used for frying and their results would probably not be the same in another country where solid and re-used oils were used for frying.–In Western countries, frying is one of the most common methods of cooking. When food is fried it becomes more calorific because the food absorbs the fat of the oils.[U1]–While eating lots of fried food can increase some heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and obesity, a link between fried food and heart disease has not been fully investigated.—So the authors, led by Professor Pilar Guallar-Castillón from Autonomous University of Madrid, surveyed the cooking methods of 40,757 adults aged 29 to 69 over an 11-year period. None of the participants had heart disease when the study began. Trained interviewers asked participants about their diet and cooking methods. Fried food was defined as food for which frying was the only cooking method used. Questions were also asked about whether food was fried, battered, crumbed or sautéed.–The participants’ diet was divided into ranges of fried food consumption, the first quartile related to the lowest amount of fried food consumed and the fourth indicated the highest amount.–During the follow-up there were 606 events linked to heart disease and 1,134 deaths.—The authors conclude: “In a Mediterranean country where olive and sunflower oils are the most commonly used fats for frying, and where large amounts of fried foods are consumed both at and away from home, no association was observed between fried food consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease or death.”–In an accompanying editorial, Professor Michael Leitzmann from the University of Regensburg in Germany, says the study explodes the myth that “frying food is generally bad for the heart” but stresses that this “does not mean that frequent meals of fish and chips will have no health consequences.” He adds that specific aspects of frying food are relevant, such as the type of oil used.—Story Source- The above story is reprinted from materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal. Journal References-P. Guallar-Castillon, F. Rodriguez-Artalejo, E. Lopez-Garcia, L. M. Leon-Munoz, P. Amiano, E. Ardanaz, L. Arriola, A. Barricarte, G. Buckland, M.-D. Chirlaque, M. Dorronsoro, J.-M. Huerta, N. Larranaga, P. Marin, C. Martinez, E. Molina, C. Navarro, J. R. Quiros, L. Rodriguez, M. J. Sanchez, C. A. Gonzalez, C. Moreno-Iribas. Consumption of fried foods and risk of coronary heart disease: Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. BMJ, 2012; 344 (jan23 3): e363 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.e363—M. F. Leitzmann, T. Kurth. Fried foods and the risk of coronary heart disease. BMJ, 2012; 344 (jan23 3): d8274 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.d8274

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Stronger Intestinal Barrier May Prevent Cancer in the Rest of the Body

ScienceDaily (Feb. 21, 2012) — A leaky gut may be the root of some cancers forming in the rest of the body, a new study published online Feb. 21 in PLoS ONE by Thomas Jefferson University researchers suggests.—It appears that the hormone receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) — a previously identified tumor suppressor that exists in the intestinal tract — plays a key role in strengthening the body’s intestinal barrier, which helps separate the gut world from the rest of the body, and possibly keeps cancer at bay. Without the receptor, that barrier weakens.—A team led by Scott Waldman, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Jefferson and director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Program at Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center, discovered in a pre-clinical study that silencing GC-C in mice compromised the integrity of the intestinal barrier. It allowed inflammation to occur and cancer-causing agents to seep out into the body, damaging DNA and forming cancer outside the intestine, including in the liver, lung and lymph nodes.—Conversely, stimulating GC-C in intestines in mice strengthened the intestinal barrier opposing these pathological changes.—A weakened intestinal barrier has been linked to many diseases, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and food allergies, but this study provides fresh evidence that GC-C plays a role in the integrity of the intestine. Strengthening it, the team says, could potentially protect people against inflammation and cancer in the rest of the body.–“If the intestinal barrier breaks down, it becomes a portal for stuff in the outside world to leak into the inside world,” said Dr. Waldman. “When these worlds collide, it can cause many diseases, like inflammation and cancer.”–The role of GC-C outside the gut has remained largely elusive. Dr. Waldman and his team have previously shown its role as a tumor suppressor and biomarker that reveals occult metastases in lymph nodes. They’ve used to it better predict cancer risk, and have even shown a possible correlation with obesity.—Reporting in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Dr. Waldman colleagues found that silencing GC-C affected appetite in mice, disrupting satiation and inducing obesity. Conversely, mice who expressed the hormone receptor knew when to call it quits at mealtime.–However, its role in intestinal barrier integrity, inflammation, and cancer outside the intestine is new territory in the field. A new drug containing GC-C is now on the verge of hitting the market, but its intended prescribed purpose is to treat constipation.–This study helps lays the groundwork, Dr. Waldman said, for future pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating GC-C’s abilities beyond those treatments in humans, including prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and cancer.”We’ve shown that when you pull away GC-C in animals, you disrupt the intestinal barrier, putting them at risk for getting inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. And when you treat them with hormones that activate GC-C it helps strengthen the integrity of the intestinal barrier,” Dr. Waldman said. “Now, if you want to prevent inflammation or cancer in humans, then we need to start thinking about feeding people hormones that activate GC-C to tighten up the barrier.”–Story Source–The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Thomas Jefferson University, via Newswise. —Journal References—Jieru Egeria Lin, Adam Eugene Snook, Peng Li, Brian Arthur Stoecker, Gilbert Won Kim, Michael Sullivan Magee, Alex Vladimir Mejia Garcia, Michael Anthony Valentino, Terry Hyslop, Stephanie Schulz, Scott Arthur Waldman. GUCY2C Opposes Systemic Genotoxic Tumorigenesis by Regulating AKT-Dependent Intestinal Barrier Integrity. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (2): e31686 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0031686–Michael A. Valentino, Jieru E. Lin, Adam E. Snook, Peng Li, Gilbert W. Kim, Glen Marszalowicz, Michael S. Magee, Terry Hyslop, Stephanie Schulz, Scott A. Waldman. A uroguanylin-GUCY2C endocrine axis regulates feeding in mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2011; 121 (9): 3578 DOI: 10.1172/JCI57925

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Boosting Longevity With Good Bacteria

ScienceDaily (Jan. 22, 2012) — A diet supplemented with a specific probiotic bacterial strain increases the lifespan of mice.—The mammalian gut is home to hundreds of bacterial species that contribute to food digestion and, in some cases, inflammatory gut diseases. Probiotics, beneficial bacterial species, can enhance gut health by keeping the resident bacteria in check. Now, a team of researchers at the RIKEN Innovation Center in Wako, including Mitsuharu Matsumoto, report that administration of the probiotic bacterial strain Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis LKM512 to mice can lengthen their lifespan. Matsumoto and colleagues previously showed that LKM512 could reduce inflammatory markers in elderly humans and modify the makeup of intestinal bacteria2, but the effects of it on lifespan still required investigation. After starting 10-month-old mice on a diet including LKM512 for 11 months, the researchers found that LKM512-treated mice lived longer, had fewer skin lesions, and had better hair quality than untreated mice. Analyses of the gut of these mice revealed elevated gene expression in some bacterial species compared with control mice, indicating that LKM512 may improve gut health indirectly by regulating the levels of other bacterial species. The LKM512 treatment also prevented some age-related changes in bacterial composition of the gut, suggesting that the probiotic treatment protects the gut from developing characteristics associated with aging.—Acting as a barrier between the bacteria and food within the gut and the rest of the human body is an important role of the gut lining. Breakdown of this lining can cause infectious or inflammatory diseases. The researchers found that the gut of LKM512-treated mice served as a stronger barrier than the gut of control mice. LKM512 seemed to perform this function by increasing the expression of various proteins that maintain the tight connection between gut epithelial cells.-Polyamines are chemicals that reduce inflammation, and their levels decrease as an individual ages. Matsumoto and colleagues observed increases in intestinal polyamine levels in LKM512-treated mice, which may be caused by the greater numbers of bacteria promoted by LKM512. The increase in polyamines caused by LKM512 appeared to reduce inflammation in the body of the mice, as inflammatory markers in the blood and urine were lower in LKM512-treated mice compared with controls. In aged mice treated with LKM512, inflammatory marker levels were similar to those observed in younger mice, indicating that adults can benefit from probiotics.—“In future work, we hope to clarify the effectiveness of LKM512 in humans,” explains Matsumoto. If the findings extend to humans, inclusion of LKM512 into the human diet could enhance overall health and increase the human lifespan.—Story Source-The above story is reprinted from materials provided by RIKEN, via ResearchSEA.

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The effect of hydro alcoholic Nettle (Urtica dioica) extracts on insulin sensitivity and some inflammatory indicators in patients with type 2 diabetes-

Pak J Biol Sci. 2011 Aug 1;14(15):775-9-Authors: Namazi N, Esfanjani AT, Heshmati J, Bahrami A

Abstract
Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is strongly associated with cardiovascular risk. Inflammation is a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In this study, hydro alcoholic extract of Nettle (Urtica dioica) on insulin sensitivity and some inflammatory indicators in type 2 diabetic patients were studied. A randomized double-blind clinical trial on 50 men and women with type 2 diabetes was done for 8 weeks. Patients were adjusted by age, sex and duration of diabetes, then randomly divided into two groups, an intervention and control group. They received, 100 mg kg-1nettle extract or placebo in three portions a day for 8 weeks[U2]. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), High Sensitive C-Reactive protein (hs-CRP) and Fasting Insulin concentration were measured. Insulin Sensitivity was calculated, at the beginning and the end of the study. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 18, p<0.05 was considered significant for all variables. After 8 weeks, IL-6 and hs-CRP showed a significant decrease in the intervention group compared to the control group (p<0.05). The findings showed that the hydro alcoholic extract of nettle has decreasing effects on IL-6 and hs-CRP in patients with type 2 diabetes after eight weeks intervention.–PMID: 22303583 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

How to prepare this—take equal parts of either wine or vodka-or tequila or grappa Add to the slow cooker-then add equal portion of distilled water or RO water-NEVER TAP WATER—allow it to simmer for 3 days—strain it and bottle it and use it accordingly—measure off your body weight and go from there as it is stated in the comments—take your weight divide by 2.2 and then mutiply by 100mg this will give dosing for your body weight so in the case of a 180 lb person—they would go 180/2.2-=== 81 kgs then multiply by 100 and you get 8100 mgs or 8.1 grams which a teaspoon holds 5 grams so you would either do a tsp and a half+ or do more dosing qith just the one teaspoon—say you take one dose several times in his case 1. ½ + 3 times a day orr 1 tsp 5 times a day—so approximate on how you want to utilize this—

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What are you to do if you have a heart attack While you are alone.

 

The Johnson City Medical Center staff actually Discovered this and did an in-depth study On it in our ICU. The two individuals that discovered this then did An article on it, had it published and have had it incorporated into ACLS and CPR classes. It is very true and has and does work. It is called cough CPR. A cardiologist says it’s the truth If everyone who gets this sends it to 10 people,

You can bet that we’ll save at least one life. It could save your life Let’s say it’s 6:15 p.m. And you’re driving home (alone of course), after an usually hard day on the job. You’re really tired, upset and frustrated. Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain In your chest that starts to radiate out Into your arm and up into your jaw. You are only about five miles from the hospital Nearest your home. Unfortunately you don’t know if you’ll be Able to make it that far. What can you do? You’ve been trained in CPR But the guy that taught the course didn’t tell You what to do if it happened to yourself Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack, this article seemed to be in order. Without help, the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint, Has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness. However, these victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously. A deep breath should be taken before each Cough, and the cough must be deep And prolonged, as when producing sputum From deep inside the chest. A breath and a cough must be repeated About every two seconds without let up Until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again. Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and Keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack victims can get to a hospital. Tell as many other people as possible about this, it could save their lives! From Health Cares, Rochester General Hospital via Chapter 240s newsletter ‘AND THE BEAT GOES ON ‘ (reprint from The Mended Hearts, Inc. Publication, Heart Response

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[U1]The question here is if this is not affecting the meditereanens then it is the type of foods perhaps they are frying and perhaps these foods are not genetically tampered with—this to would make the difference in the impact of the foods and oils used
[U2]Take your body weight and divide by 2.2 and then multiply this by 100mgs to get the total of grams used—180lb person/2.2=81 kgs the Multiply by 100 and you would need approximately 8100mgs or 8.1 grams—approximately 1 tsp and and just slightly more then half

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Show of the Week March 12 2012

 

Pfizer snaps up Emergen-C vitamin C maker

Researchers Test Sugary Solution to Alzheimer’s Disease

 

Stopping Hormone Therapy Might Help Breast Cancer to Regress

 

Potential ‘Safe Period’ For Hormone Replacement Use Identified

 

Long-Term Estrogen Therapy Linked To Breast Cancer Risk

 

Estrogen Therapy May Be Associated With Kidney Stones in Postmenopausal Women

 

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Pfizer snaps up Emergen-C vitamin C maker

28-Feb-2012
Drug giant Pfizer Inc. has added Alacer Corp., maker and distributor
of Emergen-C products, to its Consumer Healthcare division.[U1]Financial terms of the
transaction were not disclosed, but Alacer says it produces almost 500 million packets of
Emergen-C annually, with products sold in health food stores, supermarkets,
drug stores, mass merchandisers and club stores nationwide. [U2]We are very
pleased that the Emergen-C family of products will become part of Pfizer’s portfolio said Paul
Sturman, President of Pfizer Consumer Healthcare. We expect that our global network and
deep expertise in dietary supplements combined with our desire to provide consumers with
high-quality products will make Emergen-C more accessible than it has ever been before
Emergen-C products add to and greatly complement our market-leading dietary supplement
portfolio–Market Sales of vitamin C supplements – the biggest single category in the vitamins
and minerals market – were up 2.8% to $221.27m in the year to October 1 across conventional
and natural channels combined—While vitamin C sales were down 2.4% in the natural channel
(natural supermarkets excluding Whole Foods) to $31.43m, they were up 3.7% in the
conventional channel (FDMx) to $189.85m. In January, Pfizer CEO Ian Read told attendees
at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco that the company was still planning to
offload its $1.87bn nutrition division, with Nestlé, Danone, Abbott Laboratories and Heinz still in
the running. Last year, Pfizer agreed to sell hard-capsule manufacturer Capsugel for $2.375 billion
in cash to an affiliate of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts &amp; Co L.P. (KKR). A spokesperson for Pfizer
told NutraIngredients-USA.com: “The acquisition of Alacer Corp., will fall within Pfizer’s Consumer
Healthcare business. As such, this doesn’t impact the evaluation of strategic options for our Nutrition
business. “We have said that we would continue to pursue bolt-on business development activities
that support our strategies. For example, in December 2011, we acquired Ferrosan’s consumer healthcare
business, which strengthens our presence in dietary supplements as well as expand our footprint —
Unique opportunity Ron Fugate, President and CEO of Alacer said that being acquired by Pfizer marked
“the beginning of an exciting new chapter for Alacer and the Emergen-C health and wellness brand.
By becoming part of Pfizer, we can access the resources and reach that will help us support healthy,
active lifestyles across the globe.”[U3]

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Researchers Test Sugary Solution to Alzheimer’s Disease

ScienceDaily (Feb. 28, 2012) — Slowing or preventing the development of Alzheimer’s disease, a fatal brain condition expected to hit one in 85 people globally by 2050, may be as simple as ensuring a brain protein’s sugar levels are maintained.–That’s the conclusion seven researchers, including David Vocadlo, a Simon Fraser University chemistry professor and Canada Research Chair in Chemical Glycobiology, make in the latest issue of Nature Chemical Biology.-The journal has published the researchers’ latest paper “Increasing O-GlcNAc slows neurodegeneration and stabilizes tau against aggregation.”Vocadlo and his colleagues describe how they’ve used an inhibitor they’ve chemically created — Thiamet-G — to stop O-GlcNAcase, a naturally occurring enzyme, from depleting the protein Tau of sugar molecules.-“The general thinking in science,” says Vocadlo, “is that Tau stabilizes structures in the brain called microtubules. They are kind of like highways inside cells that allow cells to move things around.”—Previous research has shown that the linkage of these sugar molecules to proteins, like Tau, in cells is essential. In fact, says Vocadlo, researchers have tried but failed to rear mice that don’t have these sugar molecules attached to proteins.—Vocadlo, an accomplished chess player in his spare time, is having great success checkmating troublesome enzymes with inhibitors he and his students are creating in the SFU chemistry department’s Laboratory of Chemical Glycobiology.–Research prior to Vocadlo’s has shown that clumps of Tau from an Alzheimer brain have almost none of this sugar attached to them, and O-GlcNAcase is the enzyme that is robbing them.—Such clumping is an early event in the development of Alzheimer’s and the number of clumps correlate with the disease’s severity.–Scott Yuzwa and Xiaoyang Shan, grad students in Vocadlo’s lab, found that Thiamet-G blocks O-GlcNAcase from removing sugars off Tau in mice that drank water with a daily dose of the inhibitor. Yuzwa and Shan are co-first authors on this paper.—The research team found that mice given the inhibitor had fewer clumps of Tau and maintained healthier brains.–“This work shows targeting the enzyme O-GlcNAcase with inhibitors is a new potential approach to treating Alzheimer’s,” says Vocadlo. “This is vital since to date there are no treatments to slow its progression.–“A lot of effort is needed to tackle this disease and different approaches should be pursued to maximize the chance of successfully fighting it. In the short term, we need to develop better inhibitors of the enzyme and test them in mice. Once we have better inhibitors, they can be clinically tested. Story Source-The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Simon Fraser University. —Journal Reference-Scott A Yuzwa, Xiaoyang Shan, Matthew S Macauley, Thomas Clark, Yuliya Skorobogatko, Keith Vosseller, David J Vocadlo. Increasing O-GlcNAc slows neurodegeneration and stabilizes tau against aggregation. Nature Chemical Biology, 2012; DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.797

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Stopping Hormone Therapy Might Help Breast Cancer to Regress

ScienceDaily (Feb. 28, 2012) — As soon as women quit hormone therapy, their rates of new breast cancer decline, supporting the hypothesis that stopping hormones can lead to tumor regression, according to a report e-published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, & Prevention.—As part of the national Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, researchers studied 741,681 woman-years of data (with a median of 3.3 years per woman) on 163,490 women aged 50-79 who were Group Health Cooperative members and had no prior history of breast cancer.–“This is the first study to look over time at screening mammography use among individual women by their hormone therapy status linked with their breast cancer diagnoses,” said lead author Diana S.M. Buist, PhD, a senior investigator at Group Health Research Institute.–Previous research has shown a rapid decline in new breast cancers — and also in use of hormone therapy and of screening mammography — since 2002, when the Women’s Health Initiative published that breast cancer rates were higher in women taking estrogen and progestin than in those taking either a placebo or only estrogen.—Some have suggested that the decline in use of hormone therapy may have caused the fall in the breast cancer rate, perhaps by making tumors regress, Dr. Buist explained. But others have countered that the explanation for the declines in both breast cancer and hormone use might instead be that because former hormone users are less concerned about breast cancer or see their doctors less often, they may get less screening mammography than do women who have never taken hormones.–“We set out to test this idea,” Dr. Buist said, “and our results seem to refute it.” Before 2002, former users of hormone therapy had lower rates of screening mammography than did current users. “But we found that this is no longer true,” she said. Indeed, former users had the same or even slightly higher screening rates than current users.—“We concluded that differences in rates of screening mammography don’t explain the declines in rates of the incidence of invasive breast cancer among women who’ve stopped using hormone therapy, Dr. Buist said. The National Cancer Institute, which supports the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, funded this study. The collection of cancer data was also supported in part by several state public health departments and cancer registries throughout the United States.—In addition to Dr. Buist, the other co-authors were Diana L. Miglioretti, PhD, Rod Walker, MS, and Erin J. Aiello Bowles, MPH, of Group Health Research Institute; Walter Clinton, PhD, of Veterans Affairs (VA) Puget Sound Healthcare System; Patricia A. Carney, PhD, of Oregon Health & Science University, in Portland; Stephen H. Taplin, MD, MPH, of the National Cancer Institute; Tracy Onega, PhD, of Dartmouth Medical School, in Lebanon, NH; and Karla Kerlikowske, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco.-Story Source–The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Group Health Research Institute. \Journal Reference-Diana S.M. Buist, Rod Walker, Erin J. Aiello Bowles, Patricia A. Carney, Stephen H. Taplin, Tracy Onega, Karla Kerlikowske, Walter Clinton, and Diana L. Miglioretti. Screening Mammography Use among Current, Former, and Never Hormone Therapy Users May Not Explain Recent Declines in Breast Cancer Incidence. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, February 1, 2012 DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-1115

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Potential ‘Safe Period’ For Hormone Replacement Use Identified

ScienceDaily (Feb. 8, 2009) — A new study makes important new findings on the role of hormone use on the risk of breast cancer, confirming that the use of estrogen plus progesterone increases the risk of both ductal and lobular breast cancer far more than estrogen-only; suggesting a two-year “safe” period for the use of estrogen and progesterone; and finding that the increased risk for ductal cancers observed in long-term past users of hormone replacement therapy drops off substantially two years after hormone use is stopped.–Previous studies have shown that hormone replacement therapy after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer and that use of a regimen that includes both estrogen and progesterone is more detrimental for the breast than the use of estrogen alone. But more data from large prospective studies are needed to fully characterize the impact of exogenous hormones (Exogenousor exogeneous) refers to an action or object coming from outside a system. It is the opposite of endogenous, something generated from within the system ) on breast cancer incidence by type of hormone preparation and histology of the cancer.—To investigate the association in more detail, American Cancer Society epidemiologists led by Eugenia E. Calle, PhD, did a prospective study of 68,369 postmenopausal women who were cancer-free at baseline in 1992. They examined the use of estrogen-only and estrogen and progesterone in current and former users of varying duration, and the subsequent risk of developing invasive ductal and lobular carcinoma of the breast. They also looked at whether the risk for each type of breast cancer and each type of hormone regimen varied by body mass index (BMI), stage of disease at diagnosis, and estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. For the present study, the follow-up period ended on June 30, 2005.—They confirmed the findings from previous work that estrogen and progesterone increases the risk of both ductal and lobular breast cancer far more estrogen alone. They also found the risk associated with use of estrogen and progesterone increases significantly and substantially within three years of beginning hormone use. The data showed no increased risk for women who used estrogen and progesterone for less than two years, potentially identifying a “safe” period for estrogen and progesterone use.—The study also found no increased risk of breast cancer in women who had stopped using estrogen and progesterone two or more years ago, suggesting a window of two to three years for the risks of estrogen and progesterone both to become apparent after initial use and to diminish after cessation. Few estimates of risk within two to three years of initiation and cessation are available, so these findings need replication in other large studies. The study found the use of estrogen and progesterone was associated with a doubling of risk of lobular cancer after three years of use, and a doubling of risk of ductal cancer with 10 years of use. Estrogen-only use was not associated with increased risk of ductal cancer, even after 20 years of use, but was associated with a 50 percent increase in risk of lobular cancer after 10 years of use.—Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by American Cancer Society, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS. — Journal Reference: –Eugenia E. Calle et al. —Postmenopausal hormone use and breast cancer associations differ by hormone regimen and histologic subtype. Cancer, Published Online: January 20, 2008 DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24101

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Long-Term Estrogen Therapy Linked To Breast Cancer Risk

ScienceDaily (May 9, 2006) — Long-term estrogen therapy may be related to a higher risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women who have had a hysterectomy, according to an article in the May 8 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. —Previous studies have linked the use of hormone therapy to breast cancer among postmenopausal women, but have primarily focused on the hormone combination of estrogen plus progestin, according to background information in the article. Recently released results from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a large clinical trial of hormone therapy, found no significant link between estrogen therapy and breast cancer in women who took the hormone for seven years. —Wendy Y. Chen, M.D., M.P.H., Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, and colleagues evaluated women who were part of the Nurses’ Health Study, a group of female nurses that have been followed since 1976. In 1980, 11,508 women from the study were postmenopausal and had had a hysterectomy. Every two years the researchers enrolled all the additional women who become postmenopausal and had a hysterectomy, so 28,835 women were included by the end of the study in 2002. Women were asked by questionnaire every two years if they used hormones and whether they had developed breast cancer. For women who developed breast cancer, the researchers obtained permission to review the women’s medical records, which they used to record the hormone receptor information. Tumors were classified as positive or negative for estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor based on how they responded to specific hormonal therapies. —Throughout the study period, 934 invasive breast cancers developed, 226 among women who had never used hormones and 708 among women who were using estrogen at the time. The longer a woman used estrogen, the higher her risk of breast cancer. Those who had been taking estrogen for fewer than 10 years did not appear to have a higher risk than those who had never taken hormones, but those who had been taking estrogen for more than 20 years had a significantly increased risk. The association was strongest for cancers that were estrogen receptor positive and progesterone receptor positive. The results were similar when the researchers evaluated only women who were older than age 60; only women who had begun estrogen therapy after reaching age 50; and only women who were at least age 50 and had undergone a hysterectomy, even if they had not gone through menopause. —“In conclusion, we found that estrogen therapy was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer with longer-term use,” the authors write. “Although current use of estrogen therapy for less than 10 years was not associated with a statistically significant increase in breast cancer risk, the WHI has shown an increased risk of stroke and deep-vein thrombosis in the same time period. Women who take estrogen therapy for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis typically require longer-term treatment and should thus explore other options, given the increased risk of breast cancer with longer-term use.”—(Arch Intern Med. 2006; 166: 1027-1032. Available pre-embargo to media at http://www.jamamedia.org.) –Editor’s Note: This study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. —Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS —

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Estrogen Therapy May Be Associated With Kidney Stones in Postmenopausal Women

ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2010) — Use of estrogen therapy is associated with an increased risk of developing kidney stones in postmenopausal women, according to a report in the October 11 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.– “Nephrolithiasis [kidney stones] is a common condition that affects 5 percent to 7 percent of postmenopausal women in the United States,” according to background information in the article. “Because the process of kidney stone formation is influenced by a variety of lifestyle and other health-related factors, the true impact of estrogen therapy on the risk of kidney stone formation is difficult to infer from observational studies.” — Using data from the national Women’s Health Initiative study, Naim M. Maalouf, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, examined data from two trials: 10,739 postmenopausal women with hysterectomy who received either an estrogen-only treatment or matching placebo and 16,608 postmenopausal women without hysterectomy who received either an estrogen plus progestin treatment or matching placebo. Data were collected for an average of 7.1 years in the estrogen-only trial and 5.6 years for the estrogen plus progestin trial. — A total of 335 cases of kidney stones were reported in the active treatment groups, while 284 cases occurred in the placebo groups. The beginning demographic characteristics and risk factors for kidney stones were similar in the two groups, and the authors found that estrogen therapy was associated with a significant increase in risk of kidney stones. The corresponding annualized incidence rate per 10,000 women per year was 39 in the treatment group and 34 in the placebo group. Development of kidney stones was five times more common in women with a history of kidney stones at the beginning of the study, but was not significantly altered by estrogen therapy. In this trial, estrogen therapy increased the risk of development of kidney stones irrespective of age, ethnicity, body mass index, prior hormone therapy use or use of coffee or thiazide diuretics.The authors conclude that their results “indicate that estrogen therapy increases the risk of nephrolithiasis in healthy postmenopausal women. The mechanisms underlying this higher propensity remain to be determined. In view of the sizable prevalence of nephrolithiasis in this segment of the population, these findings need to be considered in the decision-making process regarding postmenopausal estrogen use.”—Story Source:–The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals.–Journal Reference: N. M. Maalouf, A. H. Sato, B. J. Welch, B. V. Howard, B. B. Cochrane, K. Sakhaee, J. A. Robbins. Postmenopausal Hormone Use and the Risk of Nephrolithiasis: Results From the Women’s Health Initiative Hormone Therapy Trials. Archives of Internal Medicine, 2010; 170 (18): 1678 DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2010.342

 

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[U1]I can almost bet there will be dilutions and contaminants in the product as of take over
[U2]Imagine the amount of people getting the NEW and Improved Pfizer C
[U3]What is happening is that the pharmaceuticals are going to take over the Nutraceutical brands—and with all the deregulating and re regulating going on the entrepreneur who does have a viable supplement will eventually be either litigated out or squeezed out—the fact they actually paid this much out to acquire this companies portfolio is the way it starts and eventually the FDA –DEA- Codex-EFSA will exterminate the ones that have something viable that works well with health conditions

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Show of the Week March 16 2012

 

T-UP-Sex Up Tea Recipe

 

Activation of the nuclear receptor PPARγ by metabolites isolated from sage (Salvia officinalis L.).—for Diabetes

 

Flavonol kaempferol improves chronic hyperglycemia-impaired pancreatic beta-cell viability and insulin secretory function.—-Health Benefits of Kaempferol

 

Remedies for Respiratory-Heart-Sugar Issues

 

Remedy for Heart Stability

 

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T-UP-Sex Up Tea Recipe

Ingredients—Psorlea-Dodder-Juniper berry-Nettle-Muira Purma-Celery Seed

Tribulus-Shilajit- Deer Antler– put all in at equal parts—Designed to increase T levels—Stimulate the ebb and flow—regulate the insulin-regulate the kidneys-increase blood vessel flexibility—Use By either one of 2 steps—Step 1 blend all contents to a powder and then apply 1 tablespoon to a 2 cup pot of water ( preferably distilled or reverse osmosis ) and bring to a boil —when done pour into a cup and drink at least 3 servings a day and about 30 minutes before intercource—can be added with the T Up—Step 2 shake bag contents til there is a total mix—a and add to a 2 cup pot 1-2 tablespoons and bring to boil when that is done then allow the stove to be off and allow it to simmer for 5 minutes then drink

 

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Activation of the nuclear receptor PPARγ by metabolites isolated from sage (Salvia officinalis L.).—for Diabetes

Christensen KB, Jørgensen M, Kotowska D, Petersen RK, Kristiansen K, Christensen LP.

Source –Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Allé 1, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark. kbch@kbm.sdu.dk

Abstract-ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Salvia officinalis has been used as a traditional remedy against diabetes in many countries and its glucose-lowering effects have been demonstrated in animal studies. The active compounds and their possible mode of action are still unknown although it has been suggested that diterpenes may be responsible for the anti-diabetic effect of Salvia officinalis.

AIM OF THE STUDY–To investigate whether the reported anti-diabetic effects of Salvia officinalis are related to activation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and to identify the bioactive constituents.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

From a dichloromethane extract of Salvia officinalis able to activate PPARγ several major metabolites were isolated by chromatographic techniques. To assess bioactivity of the isolated metabolites a PPARγ transactivation assay was used.

RESULTS:

Eight diterpenes were isolated and identified including a new abietane diterpene being the epirosmanol ester of 12-O-methyl carnosic acid and 20-hydroxyferruginol, which was isolated from Salvia officinalis for the first time, as well as viridiflorol, oleanolic acid, and α-linolenic acid. 12-O-methyl carnosic acid and α-linolenic acid were able to significantly activate PPARγ whereas the remaining metabolites were either unable to activate PPARγ or yielded insignificant activation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Selected metabolites from Salvia officinalis were able to activate PPARγ and hence, the anti-diabetic activity of this plant could in part be mediated through this nuclear receptor

 

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Flavonol kaempferol improves chronic hyperglycemia-impaired pancreatic beta-cell viability and insulin secretory function.

Zhang Y, Liu D.

Source–Faculty of Life Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, 710072, China.

Considerable evidence shows that chronic hyperglycemia can cause pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction, which contributes to progressive deterioration of glucose homeostasis and overt diabetes. In the present study, we found that kaempferol, a flavonol compound present in various Chinese medicinal herbs, has cytoprotective effects on cultured clonal beta-cells and pancreatic human islets. Kaempferol treatment dose-dependently promoted viability, inhibited cellular apoptosis, and reduced caspase-3 activity in beta-cells and human islets exposed to chronic high glucose, with 10 μM kaempferol exerting the maximum effect. In addition, kaempferol treatment improved the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Akt and Bcl-2 that was significantly reduced in beta-cells and human islets chronically exposed to hyperglycemia. Furthermore, exposure of beta-cells and human islets to kaempferol restored high glucose-attenuated intracellular cAMP and ATP production. Inhibition of protein kinase A or Akt activation ablated the anti-apoptotic effect of kaempferol. These cytoprotective effects of kaempferol were associated with improved insulin secretory function and synthesis in beta-cells and human islets. These findings provide evidence that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic compound by protecting pancreatic beta-cell survival and function in a hostile environment that would otherwise lead to type 2 diabetes.—– Tea (black) (dry leaf)-126.96— Tea (green) (dry leaf)

Health Benefits of Kaempferol—Keampferol is a strong antioxidant and helps to prevent oxidative damage of our cells, lipids and DNA. Kaempferol seems to prevent arteriosclerosis by inhibiting the oxidation of low density lipoprotein and the formation of platelets in the blood. Studies have also confirmed that kaempferol acts as a chemopreventive agent, which means that it inhibits the formation of cancer cells.

An in vitro study by Jan Kowalski et al (Pharmacological Reports, 2005) showed that kaempferol inhibits monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1). MCP-1 plays a role in the initial steps of atherosclerotic plaque formation.

The flavonoids kaempferol and quercetin seems to act synergistically in reducing cell proliferation of cancer cells, meaning that the combined treatments with quercetin and kaempferol are more effective than the additive effects of each flavonoid. This was a conclusion from a study by ML Ackland et al (In Vivo, Feb 2005) titled “Synergistic antiproliferative action of the flavonols quercitin and kaempferol in cultured human cancer cell lines””.

A study “Inhibition of P-glycoprotein function and expression by kaempferol and quercetin” by the Chiang Mai University, Thailand, found that kaempferol can help to fight cancer because it reduces the resistance of cancer cells to anti-cancer drugs such as vinbalstine and paclitaxel.
Synonyms–Campherol, indigo yellow, nimbecetin, 3,4′,5,7-Tetrahydroxyflavone
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Remedies for Respiratory-Heart-Sugar Issues

 

Garlic-Sage- Bioflavonoid-Honey—Take 3-4 bulbs of garlic and 1 tablespoon of powdered Sage-8-9 pieces of the Bioflavonoids from citrus-add to 1-1/12 cup of unpasteurized honey—blend all the ingredients til there is a total fusion or the honey liquifies all the components—use 1 tsp as needed—this will clearly remove toxic waste and particulates that may occur in the system from respiratory to liver—this will dramatically reduce Sugar and sustain heart balance and flow—will increase permeability of the blood vessels—this will regulate the insulin as well from the sage and garlic will have strong antibacterial-antifungal properties-and potent antioxidant properties—

Would be used for Respiratory-issues –Congestions and Cloggy lungs—Heart and Circulation-Permeability and Flow-Anti Plaque and Fat build up in arteries and liver-Immune Support to resist Bacteria and Fungal infections-Chelating elements and Pollutants out of the system

 

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Remedy for Heart Stability

 

Hawthorn Berry – Rose-Honey- Take ½ cup of Roses and Hawthorn berry and ½ cup of Unpasteurized Honey—add the Honey and get it going whipping it for about 5 minutes then add the other 2 ingredients slowly and pause in the loading-allowing the blender to fuse the honey and the components—then add more –repeat this til you completely empty your content—allow this to blend for about 15-20 minutes optimum speed or high speed—this will heat and completely saturate—when done stop blender—add to glass container—

Use 1 tablespoon several times a day as a means to balance out heart irregularities

 

Consuming rose and Hawthorn berry this will stabilize heart and allow for a steady heart rate—in conjunction to this you may want to utilize Taurine 500 mgs 2-3 times a day Magnesium Citrate 100-200 mgs 2-3 times a day

And utilizing a good Vitamin E supplement 200-400 IU’s 2 times a day

 

Consume adequate Salt and potassium as well to stabilize heart functions—

At the same time ALL PROCESS SUGARS ARE TO CEASE—NO EXCEPTIONS—NO SYNTHETIC SWEETNERS—NO EXCEPTIONS-NO SOY BASED FOODS UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCE SINCE THIS LEACES OUT MAGNESIUM AS WELL AS VITAMIN E-NO EXCEPTIONS-ALL GRAINS AND CEREALS ARE TO CEASE-NO EXCEPTIONS

 

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Show of the Week March 19 2012

 

Identification of antiplatelet and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory constituents in betel nut

 

Acetylcholinesterase inhibition in cognition-relevant brain areas of mice treated with a nootropic Amazonian herbal (Marapuama).

 

Antioxidants from black tea may aid diabetics— Recipe For Sugar Regulating

 

Garlic (Allium sativum) supplementation with standard antidiabetic agent provides better diabetic control in type 2 diabetes patients

 

Exercise and Caffeine Change Your DNA in the Same Way

 

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